Big Island Lava Flow Advances East

One thing we know for certain about volcanic activity is that it’s predictably unpredictable. Volcanic activity comes and goes and moves around as it pleases. If I remember correctly, a few months ago, experts expected the lava to move westward back towards Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Well, the lava had other thoughts. It began a  move to the East, which is not exactly welcome news for the nearby residents. Yesterday’s lava update from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reported:

Lava from the TEB vent flowed through tubes that carried lava down-slope to feed active surface flows that advanced through the coastal highway 130/137 intersection over the weekend; active surface flows continued eastward advancement toward nearby structures as reported by HVO and University of Hawai`i geologists yesterday; a second set of advancing lobes was approximately 1 km (0.6 miles) to the northwest and also advancing toward this general area.

The United States Geological Survey regularly updates lava flow maps. The following map is the most recent release from last week and it shows the eastward movement.

image

Pacific Island Park’s blog shared images and video from the recent eastward lava flow. (Click on this link to see their complete post .) One of the more concerning images is the photo of a nervous homeowner standing on his roof to view the flow.

image
Homeowner surveys the active lava flow from his rooftop. Image credit to pacificislandparks.com

From YouTube, volcanochaser filmed the following video showing the lava flow on Highway 137. (Email subscribers, click here for the video.)

What an incredible force these images display!

The public lava viewing point remains open per the Kalapana Lava Viewing Hotline (808.961.8093). The viewing point is at the end of Highway 130 in Kalapana. It’s open from 2pm to 10pm daily, with the last car allowed in at 8pm. To see the lava, a 2-mile roundtrip hike is required. See my tips for viewing the Big Island lava flow.

3 comments
  1. In all of the 45 years that I have lived here I’ve yet to fly over to the big island when the volcano is erupting.

    Thanks for putting the video on your site. It was very interesting for my little grandson and me to watch.

    I shared it on my facebook.

    Karen in Honolulu

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Hawaii Vacation Must Haves
You May Also Like

Pahoehoe and A’a Lava

There are two distinct types of hardened lava you’ll likely see in Hawaii – pahoehoe and a’a.  These are Hawaiian names that have been adopted universally for describing the two…
Read Article